White Fang () - White Fang, three-fourths wolf and one- fourth dog, develops a reputation as the fiercest dog in the northwest. A complementary tale to The. Born in the wilds of the freezing Yukon, the wolf-cub White Fang soon learns the harsh I run this site alone and spend an awful lot of time creating these books. Full text books - archive of free books, texts, documents, classic literature, White Fang by Jack London Download this document as leostovrefisis.ga: File size: MB.

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    White Fang Book Pdf

    It was cold and the pack was hungry. In truth, they looked more like skeletons than wolves. At the front of the pack ran a large gray wolf. He was one of the. Free Download. PDF version of White Fang by Jack London. Apple, Android and Kindle formats also available. White Fang is a companion novel to The Call of the Wild. "White Fang" is part dog , part wolf and all brute, living in the frozennorth; he gradually comes PalmDOC .pdb), PDF .pdf), PDF - custom .pdf) *, PDF Large Print .pdf), Plain text .txt), Plucker Get Free eBooks and book bargains from ManyBooks in your inbox.

    Jack London Excerpt: Dark spruce forest frowned on either side the frozen waterway. The trees had been stripped by a recent wind of their white covering of frost, and they seemed to lean towards each other, black and ominous, in the fading light. A vast silence reigned over the land. The land itself was a desolation, lifeless, without movement, so lone and cold that the spirit of it was not even that of sadness. There was a hint in it of laughter, but of a laughter more terrible than any sadness—a laughter that was mirthless as the smile of the sphinx, a laughter cold as the frost and partaking of the grimness of infallibility. It was the masterful and incommunicable wisdom of eternity laughing at the futility of life and the effort of life. It was the Wild, the savage, frozen-hearted Northland Wild. But there was life, abroad in the land and defiant. Down the frozen waterway toiled a string of wolfish dogs. Their bristly fur was rimed with frost. Their breath froze in the air as it left their mouths, spouting forth in spumes of vapour that settled upon the hair of their bodies and formed into crystals of frost. Leather harness was on the dogs, and leather traces attached them to a sled which dragged along behind. The sled was without runners. It was made of stout birch-bark, and its full surface rested on the snow.

    The book focuses on the wolf himself—how he thinks, grows, and learns how to determine which "gods," as he thinks of men, are good and which are evil. But, as different as they are, both the book and the movie revolve around the same central theme.

    A big difference, and the most important, is how much more clearly the moral message comes through because of the point of view from which London writes. He uses a third person omniscient narrator so that we can see how the animals think. We learn values at the same time as White Fang, and the impact they have is stronger than the movie's attempt to send the same message.

    In the movie, you see the action but you don't feel it; you don't experience it through the eyes of the animal. Thus, London's point of view is uncanny as well as unique in its ability to portray these morals in a fascinating yet sincere way. The book begins with two men who are taking a third man who was not strong enough to fight the harsh grip of the Arctic winter back to a trading post in a coffin to be shipped back to England for burial.

    But before they reach their destination, they are trailed and tortured, night after night, by a pack of hungry wolves who have come upon the first sign of life in weeks, which is not unusual for the famine season of a deep winter above the Arctic Circle.

    PDF Online White Fang Any Format

    Then he hits upon something that works. He had ceased from his growling and stood, head up, looking into their faces. His throat worked spasmodically, but made no sound, while he struggled with all his body, convulsed with the effort to rid himself of the incommunicable something that strained for utterance. At this moment speech came to White Fang, rushing up in a great burst of barking.

    London was, for his time, a skilled observer and describer of animal behavior. In White Fang, he describes how a wolf-dog hybrid is moved from the wilderness to gradually more domesticated situations, and how he, in response to environmental challenges, develops skills that according to modern ethology are characteristics of domestic dogs: the ability to learn and follow social rules, to form attachments to humans, to interpret hu- man intentions, and to communicate with humans in order to solve prob- lems.

    As several studies show, dogs are considerably more proficient at these skills than wolves, and I think it is interesting to speculate whether London made White Fang a wolf-dog hybrid rather than a wolf because he assumed that a similar development in a purebred wolf would be un- likely. Works cited Abrantes, Roger , Dog Language. London, Jack, The Call of the Wild. Robisch, S. Topal, Jozef, et al. Advances in the Study of Behaviour 39, pp. The papers have been collected here, in the same order as they were presented at the conference, but sadly, for practical and eco- nomic reasons, without the many illustrations used in the presentations.

    It shows for example how animal characters and animal narrators evoke in the reader a con- cern for their situation as victims of what humans do to the environment.

    White Fang

    Only the person who, through the mental nourishment he has received, sees more clearly, feels more ardently, has absorbed completely the wealth of life, has been really educated. This education can be gained in the most irregular way, perhaps around the hearth or in the field, on the seashore or in the wood; it can be acquired from old tattered books or from nature itself.

    What kind of nature is it then that we meet in Beskow, what part does it play and how is it depicted? In this short presen- tation I will concentrate on the forest only. The book struck a new note since it lacked direct pedagogical pointers but instead was characterised by a sort of playfulness and magic. In this book nature and its inhabitants come to the aid of humans, indeed, nature is seen almost as a paradise-like condition.

    New York and London, p. Through his meeting with nature, with the forest, the child Peter, who in true Ro- mantic spirit is also receptive to impressions from another dimension than reality, is led into the world of fantasy. When he searches the forest for berries in vain, a tiny man comes to his rescue. Here fairy tale and real- ity merge into a wide-eyed observation of dreamlike pictures and realistic details.

    Her exact observations of nature give credibility to the fantastic. Details of nature are woven into the narrative and never become a decorative end in themselves. Beskow gets close in on the motif. In her story-telling and meticulous drawing she focuses on what is at the micro level in nature. It is the closeness to the ground, with pine needles, rotten leaves and palm-like ferns that captures her interest.

    She makes co-actors of ants, spiders, wasps, ladybirds, grasshoppers, lizards, snails, mice, beetles and caterpillars in the fairy-tale-like course of events. In the entirety that arises upon reading the text and pictures, in the iconotext, an almost symbiotic interplay between text and picture emerg- es. Through this close interplay, Beskow not only gives nature a voice, but also intensifies the experience of nature and conveys an emotional empathy and a conception of nature that can be said to be particular to the Nordic countries: Nature welcoming the child, the innocent human being, and opening up her senses to a new, exciting and at the same time well-ordered world.

    By means of the fairy-tale form and the realistic illustration of humanlike figures in an easily recognisable natural environment, Beskow succeeds in conveying a feeling of being chosen and in communion with nature surrounding us. Exhibited there were stuffed animals placed in artificial habitats set against realisti- cally depicted countryside backgrounds by the well-known nature painter Bruno Liljefors.

    Children of the Forest is a tale of the seasons, beginning in the late sum- mer. The narrative begins by telling us that the forest family live under the same conditions and terms as the other inhabitants of the forest.

    Also read: WHITE MAGIC BOOK

    Beskow presents the forest family thus: Deep in the forest, under the curling roots of an old pine tree, was a small house. Warm and dry in winter, cool and airy in summer, it was the home of one of the forest people. He lived there with his wife and four children; Tom, Harriet, Sam and Daisy. Wild strawberries and mushrooms grew by their door and they had all the pots, pans, chairs, beds, tables, knives, forks and spoons they could possibly need.

    Sheltered under the pine tree branches, they hardly felt the autumn gales and if it rained, the children crept underneath a giant toad- stool to keep dry.

    The children are often out on their own, they are invited to flying trips by the bat at the forest lake in the eve- ning, they swing with the elves, run away from the playful mountain troll, and their red hats act as camouflage when hiding from humans and wild animals.

    The winter gives them school holidays and games in the snow, and the spring brings happy hours at the stream — and a new child in the family. The life cycle begins anew. On the whole the relationship between humans in elf guise and ani- mals is symbiotic. It has been so cold that some of our friends may not have enough to eat. Nature is not hostile and never hits back, but continues to exist in an almost idyllic, preindustrial state of balance and unspoiledness.

    But like in every paradise, there is a snake.

    Father, in his fir cone apparel, demonstrates his bravery in the battle against the snake in this paradise. It can be said that Bes- kow is portraying an eco-system that is harmonious in an unnatural way. The animals and humanoids live in an artificial, non-aggressive balance. The Iron Heel Jack London.

    Burning Daylight Jack London. Lost Face Jack London. Dark spruce forest frowned on either side the frozen waterway. The trees had been stripped by a recent wind of their white covering of frost, and they seemed to lean towards each other, black and ominous, in the fading light. A vast silence reigned over the land. The land itself was a desolation, lifeless, without movement, so lone and cold that the spirit of it was not even that of sadness.

    There was a hint in it of laughter, but of a laughter more terrible than any sadness—a laughter that was mirthless as the smile of the sphinx, a laughter cold as the frost and partaking of the grimness of infallibility. It was the masterful and incommunicable wisdom of eternity laughing at the futility of life and the effort of life.

    It was the Wild, the savage, frozen-hearted Northland Wild. But there was life, abroad in the land and defiant. Down the frozen waterway toiled a string of wolfish dogs. Their bristly fur was rimed with frost. Their breath froze in the air as it left their mouths, spouting forth in spumes of vapour that settled upon the hair of their bodies and formed into crystals of frost. Leather harness was on the dogs, and leather traces attached them to a sled which dragged along behind.

    Part 5, Chapter 2: The Southland Notes from White Fang

    The sled was without runners. It was made of stout birch-bark, and its full surface rested on the snow. The front end of the sled was turned up, like a scroll, in order to force down and under the bore of soft snow that surged like a wave before it.

    On the sled, securely lashed, was a long and narrow oblong box. There were other things on the sled—blankets, an axe, and a coffee-pot and frying-pan; but prominent, occupying most of the space, was the long and narrow oblong box.

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